How We Protect You From Vectors

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The San Gabriel Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District is a public health agency that is committed to providing the highest level of protection from vectors and vector-borne diseases to people in the District.

We incorporate an integrated vector management (IVM) program comprised of several key activities to protect public health.

Integrated Vector Management Activities

Education - You can control your risk of mosquito-borne diseases by making sure you have healthy habits. This means much of mosquito control is motivating people to build healthy habits. The District education program includes community event participation, in-class school visits (K-12), and getting the word out through literature and the occassional advertising. 

Disease Surveillance – Mosquito traps and surveillance techniques provide data to drive decisions of where to send resources. Staff conducts surveillance of vector-borne diseases and populations of mosquitoes. Vector ecologists test for the presence of arboviruses such as West Nile virus (WNV), Zika, St. Louis encephalitis (SLE), Western equine encephalitis (WEE), and more.

Source Reduction - Mosquitoes need stagnant water to complete their life cycles. A majority of our control efforts target sources of water that can be eliminated. We urge residents to do what the pros do: Tip 'n toss, show mosquitoes who's boss!

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Biological Control - For larger, permanent sources, the District uses mosquito fish as a natural biological control. This is a great way to prevent mosquito larvae from developing in ornamental fountains, ponds and other stagnant sources.

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Chemical Control (larvae and pupae) - The District nearly always controls for the aquatic stages of a vector's life cycle: The larvae and pupae. When conditions that support vectors cannot be removed or altered sufficiently, as a last resort, it may be necessary to use chemical control. These public health pesticides ("larvicides") are highly selective, environmentally benign and have little to no effect on non-target organisms when applied according to the label.. Some examples of our pesticide ingredients include mineral oil and bacteria (Bti), which can be found in many home improvement stores.

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Chemical Control (adult) - If there is a public health threat, it may be necessary to use public health pesticides ("adulticides") to reduce the adult mosquito population. This is to reduce the risk of adult mosquitoes spreading diseases to people when they bite. These public health pesticides are highly selective, environmentally benign and have little to no effect on non-target organisms when applied according to the label.